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. professor robert edwards has died at the age of 87. the first test- tube baby, and it earned him a nobel prize. birth caused a sensation. good louise brown was cradled in .he arms of bob edwards commo the record now how the mother was forced to go into hiding from the press even terrain -- .ven during the presidency >> secretly, he did the mother in the car. whovf gave hope to others wanted to conceive. the fertility specialists remember bob edwards as a generous, moderate man. >> i do not think there is another biologist who had such a practical and positive affect on humankind. if you think about all the children and who have been born, all the couples who are happy because they have their own children, it is because bob edwards. >> louise brown says she always regarded bob edwards as like a grandfather. now she now has a son conceived naturally. bob edwards, who was also knighted for his work, once said the most important thing in life is having a child. >> today thousands of immigrants and those who support reform in the immigration system rallied across the country. they gather near
with fresh tires. >> when they go down to turn one it's all bets off on this start. carl edwards last year clearly close to having a victory. he has a chance to redeem himself here. i'm a big race fan and it doesn't get better than this. short track racing on saturday night. a nascar sprint cup win hangs in the balance. >> and they have a full moon even if they there are clouds muddying the picture. juan pablo montoya said after kansas last week, we're fast. we just have to eliminate mistakes. you thought that was a guy being optimistic. but they have been fast and eliminated mistakes and was that close to victory. >> he and jamie mcmurray have been strong this year. they decided to roll the dice and start on the outside of front row. but i have been impressed with the chip ganassi team. it looked like if not for a crash by brian vickers they had it worked out. >> of the drivers in the top seven only carl edwards has won this year. some of the streaks and how long it's been for guys, you see jeff burton, virginia native, mark martin, certainly in that mix. we talked about montoya and jamie
thumping/groaning sounds ] [ male announcer ] subway® keeps carl edwards' engine racing with his low fat, protein-powered favorite, the sweet onion chicken teriyaki -- made exactly the way he says, with spinach, green peppers and black olives. [ mockingly ] i'm going to jump off the car... >> chris: 24 laps to go in texas. that is car 24. jeff gordon in the garage area after running third. what happened, krista? >> krista: well, he came on radio and thought it was a flat left-front tire. he said he knew that was where the problem was. when came in the tire looked fine. the left-front hub was completely burned up. >> mike: gordon out of race. as he turned to the garage dale earnhardt, jr. came down pit road for another stop. out front, martin truex. there is kyle busch who cutted lead to 1.1 seconds. >> darrell: hold the phone. the 18 is closing. the last couple of laps made up a couple of tenths a lap. he is coming. >> larry: it was 2.5 tenths on the last lap. may have listened to what dave rogers said. save your tires. maybe he saved enough tires and now going to stand on the gas. >> mi
/pimp character who encourages her to kind of dry hustle edward g. robinson, to encourage him to think that she's a struggling actress who needs support. edward g. robinson starts stealing things from his harridan of a wife. he sets her up in an apartment where he is also going to come and paint. johnny takes the paintings to an art dealer and finds they can make some kind of money, and before they know it, kitty is signing chris's paintings and making money out of them. chris discovers this plot but doesn't care because he's so enamored of kitty. eventually we think that edward j. robinson is going to knock off his wicked wife. however, by some elaborate subplot, he's managed to get rid of his shrewish wife, and he arrives one night ... and sees his lady love saying sweet nothings and embracing the pimpy character, who blows up when edward j. robinson walks away. chris returns and she ridicules him. she attacks his manliness. he picks up an ice pick and he brutally murders her. however, he's not seen leaving the house. dan durea breaks back into the apartment building, and edward g. robinson s
atención de edward james olmos. >f>> ue muy impresionante. >>> gina rodríguez es la hija de jenni rivera, una joven poeta de la calle que descubre la forma de ser dj. >>> es que esas escenas fueron fuertes. >>>t an fuertesl, pero fue una bendición, ella es una persona muy bella, con un corazón muy grande. >>> las escenas más memorables fue con jenni rivera. >>> perdona, gina, no, te quiero mucho, jenni, i know. >e>> l propósito de majo es sacar a jenni rivera de la cárcel. >>> este papel me dio una familia, jenni rivera, lou diamond, edward james olmos. >>> le das gracias a dios. >>>ttodos los días. >>> y edward dice que quedó sorprendido con un acto de generosidad de jenni rivera, al darle el salario de la película para un fotógrafo que tomaba imágenes grrt . >>> gracias; roger borges, se acerca el dai de las madres y nosotros queremos reconocer a las mamás de nuestros noticieros, envíenos una foto de su mamá y cuéntenos qué es la oque más les agradece y por mensaje directo podrá ver el mensaje por la pantalla derecha, y que su mamá esté pendiente, muchas gracias pr a
-old tsarnaev indicated he and his brother were motivated by religious extremism. cbs reporter edward lawrence joins us now from boston with more. good morning. >>> reporter: good morning, michelle and frank. cbs news sources have learned actually that e -o t g that interrogation that he had a role in the bombings here at the marathon. he has a bail hearing and probable cause hearing on may 30th. 19-year-old johar tsarnaev's hospital room became a makeshift courtroom monday. a federal judge arraigned the terror suspect and announced he is being charged with using a weapon of mass destruction during boston marathon bombings last week. it killed three and injured 180. if convicted, he could face the death penalty. prosecutors believe he and his 26-year-old brother tamerlan placed two pressure cooker bombs on boylston street around the marathon finish line. tamerlan died friday in a shootout with police. johar is being treated for gunshot wounds here at beth israel hospital but despite being listed in serious condition, the judge said, i find that the death of is alert, mentally competent and luc
'm joy inhibition and director of the of the citizens complaints. also is here is edward mcman in the office for those of you that may have questions after the conclusion of my remarks or after this meeting. it's a pleasure to be here with you this evening. we are also known as the occ, the occ is the third largest oversight civilian -- is surpassed by new york city and the civilian oversight agency in chicago. the occ was created by a board of supervisors chartered amended in 1982. we are 30 years old. the o c c was originally an office in the san francisco police department but later placed under the direct soups of the police commission. we are an independent agency, separate from the police department and civilians as are the police commissioners. the function is to building trust with the community by building a bridge between the police and the community. to that end the occ a mission to ensure police accountability by conducting fair, timely and unbiased investigations and also making recommendations on police policies and practices and finally by conducting immediat
birdie drive, novato, ca 94949. attorney for the appellant: david edward may, 476 jackson st., 3rd floor, san francisco, ca 94111-1624. action requested for the appellant: the appellant is requesting the director's order be overturned and requesting the abatement appeals board's assistance in resolving the outstanding code violations.: 767 north point street. owner of record and appellant: charles b. engelberg, 767 north point street, san francisco, ca 94109. owner of record and appellant: charles b. engelberg, 4 birdie drive, novato, ca 94949. attorney for the appellant: david edward may, 476 jackson st., 3rd floor, san francisco, ca 94111-1624. action requested for the appellant: the appellant is requesting the director's order be overturned and requesting the abatement appeals board's assistance in resolving the outstanding code violations. >> is the department going to make a presentation? >> yes and then the appellant. >> is there someone here from the department? finishing up with the last item. >> this is a single family dwelling where we have a typical notice of violation regard
that jason came out. edward says although collins will be very well accepted, there will be some who will not like his decision to come out. edwards says collins is going to have to deal with that. what do i think about death threats and the nasty letters that he's inevident eblely going to get. >> so it takes a man of great courage to do what he did today. i'm happy for him. he's going to be able to be the complete jason collins, every day, for the rest of his life. >> now, the support for jason collins goes beyond the sports role. tonight, former president bill clinton released a statement. his daughter, chelsea was a friend here at stanford. the statement of a good man who wants no more than what so many of us seek to be able to do what we want because of who we are. we're life at stanford, nbc, bay area news. >> we've got a lot more on our web site, including a link to the column he wrote for "sports illustrated." all you need to do is search jason collins. >> yes, a lot of you are going to enjoy all of this sunshine coming by the coast. once again, winds are going to get gusty,
wounded in the explosions remain hospitalized. doctors say all will survive. now, edward lawrence is at israel deaconess hospital where dzhokhar tsarnaev is being treated right now. edward, good morning. >> reporter: good morning. the 19-year-old suspect admitted he played a role in the boston marathon bombings according to cbs news sources. now he has bail and probable cause hearing on may 30th. 19-year-old dzhokhar tsarnaev's hospital room became a makeshift courtroom monday. a federal judge arraigned the terror suspect and announced he's being charged with using a weapon of mass destruction during the boston marathon bombings last week that killed three and injured 180. if convicted, he could face the death penalty. prosecutors believe dzhokhar and his 26-year-old brother, tamerlan, placed two pressure cooker bombs on boylston street around the marathon finish line. tamerlan died friday in a shootout with police. dzhokhar is being treated for gunshot wounds. despite being listed in serious condition, the judge said i find that the defendant is alert, mentally competent and luci
the surviving suspect faces a list of charges. cbs reporter edward lawrence is live in boston and says that suspect could face the death penalty. edward? >> reporter: boston and the nation paused about 10 minutes ago to honor the exact moment when the two bombs went off at the marathon finish. meanwhile, the case against the teenaged bombing suspect is moving forward. a federal judge went to his room today at his hospital room and charged him with the crimes. bells tolled across boston after the city held a moment of silence to mark the one-week anniversary of the marathon bombings. the bombing suspect faced a judge from his hospital bed this morning. dzhokhar tsarnaev has been charged with using a weapons of mass destruction and could face death. the 19-year-old has been responding to investigators' questions in writing because an injury is preventing him from speaking. cbs news has learned his answers suggest johar and his brother tamerlan acted alone. >> he is not saying there is a whole second wave of plots or plotters here. still, there are places where they made the explosives an
friends, donna edwards, one of our favorites, congresswoman from maryland. cindy boren, another big favorite of ours the supports blogger for the washington post will join us as well. then we will spend time with media matters looking at the sunday talk shows and what little they are doing to provide any real balance. all that and more coming up right here. but first... >> this is the full court press. >> other headlines making news on this friday secretary of state john kerry quenches his thirst. he won a bet with the foreign minister of canada over the women's world hockey championship and the u.s. beat canada 3 to 2 on tuesday. so yesterday, john baird presented kerry with a case of molten lager in a meeting in canada. h canada won, kerry would have had to give him a case of sam adams. >> he is going to south korea, from london to south korea. >> and drinking beer while he is doing it. >> we may not see any super crazy guests at the upcoming white house correspondents dinner because the person known for bringing them is not coming greta van sustre
.com/tsacomment. >> first, edward hasbrack. fly may have been coinedor him. our first meeting that i recall was in boston and during the eeting of the d.h.s. privacy committee he accosted me in the hall and was virtually holding me there to insist i crack the d.h.s. the arguments were meritorious and demeanor intense. he is called the go-to authority on international travel and how to get the best deals on the internet. he is an author, journalist, consumer advocate and true travel expert. he is the author of "the practical nomad, how to travel .round the world" would nary travel expert be ordinary but after 9/11 he impingements we were suffering on freedom to trample along to get go along but turned his efforts debating ourng and freedom to travel. he is one of the foremost xperts on the surveillance of our travel through i.t. systems. that is why i wanted him to speak with us. also as a consultant to the identity project on travel related human rights and civil liberties issues that was founded by john gilmore. he i have fondness for because at a different meeting he challenged also as a consultante ot
was taken in 1966 on an earlier visit to memphis. at king's side, that's officer edward redditt. on that visit, king stayed in his usual room off the balcony at the lorraine motel. redditt remembers. >> we put our bodies around him coming out of that room at the lorraine, and we walked him down the steps to make sure he was covered, because it is dangerous. if you look at that balcony, so many areas you can see that's visible if i want to get you. >>> re democratic ditt approached king at breakfast at the lorraine to tell him it was dangerous. >> why you want to stay up here? he said, i like the room. he'd laugh. i'd say, okay. >> that was two years before dr. king's death. by then most of his civil rights victories were already behind him. his nonviolent protests brought out the worst in white america. police dogs and fire hoses in birmingham in 1963. alabama state troopers beating back protestors on the bridge in selma in 1965. and their violence would strike a flint on the nation's conscience. >> and we shall overcome. >> president lyndon johnson pushed through landmark civil
marathon finish line reopened to the public just a few hours ago. cbs reporter edward lawrence is in boston this morning. edward, investigators they have more details now. >> reporter: they are getting more details now that the suspect has been upgraded. interrogators are back inside his hospital room getting more information from him. he is apparently telling them reportedly the how and the why he attacked as the people in boston heal. the barricades came down early this morning on boylston street the site of last week's deadly marathon bombings. prior to opening the area, police escorted bombing victims to the scene for a private ceremony tuesday night. >> when you're face to face with the people directly affected and you see the bandages, you just feel what they feel. >> reporter: these new photos appear to show the suspect 26- year-old tamerlan tsarnaev and his 19-year-old brother johar in a shootout with people -- with police last friday. tamerlan was killed. johar was captured later hiding in a bow. -- in a boat. dzhokhar tsarnaev was taken here to beth israel medical center with guns
con edward kennedy en otras protestas en el país . >> el >> en una declaración dicen estar preocupados por la limitacion de visas >> la principal negociadora sindicalista dice que si podrán haber trabajadores extranjeros >> este trabajo es para la spsa locales y si no lo encuentran ahí podrán traer de cualquier parte del mundo >> se busca reeditar las marchas de 2006 y 2007 y presionar parq una reforma migratoria >> el Área de la bahía se vio azotada esta mañana púpor fuertes lluvias y esta es la pregunta en el pronóstico del tiempo >> buenos días >> jueves de media poulgada de lluvias en el Área de la bahía . >> ustedes en palo alto con .29 y la posibilidad de chubascos continúa esta noche hacia la acapital >> en las 24 horas próximas continúa estoi >> el úpronóstico del tiempo más adelante >> si busca trabajo le diremos en donde hay y si es bilingua hay más posibilidades >> indocumentado abandonado a su suerte >> los impactos del stress en la salud >> ya regresamos con los detalles >> el presidente barack obama asistio a dos eventos para recaudar fondos en dos lugar
ago, i spoke at length with boston's police commissioner edward davis, and i asked him about the report that the captured suspects may have tried to kill himself. listen. there are reports that he is injured in the throat, cannot speak, and there are also reports that he may have tried to take his own life and thus the injuries to his throat. what do you know about that? >> this is a very complex investigation, and it's hard to say exactly how he received that injury. there was certainly a shootout in watertown. there were explosives thrown, so that's being looked into right now. hard to say exactly how it occurred. >> from the evidence that you have gathered at the scene, we've seen a number of reports, and even from police saying that there were explosives being thrown out of the car. even on the scene when i was in watertown the other day, they said that he had long rifles, that the media should be safe. how much ammunition and what other weapons did he have on him when you got him at the scene? >> the teams that are picking up evidence there have collected over 200 rounds
from edward to it when i saw him give this presentation at the center for justice at nyu a few months ago, i thought that more people need to see this. more people need to understand the internet travel surveillance that the government conducts over all of us law-abiding and lawbreaking when we try to move the country were moved around the world. so first we are going to have a full presentation from edward hasbrouch letcher think is interesting and concerning. after that, we will turn to the news topics, the recent tsa rulemaking in the area of strip search machines. ginger mccall will talk about the latest developments in that area with the introduction of the rulemaking on the part of the tsa thing to do with its rulemaking being required by court order and having taken 20 months to produce the two sentences of regulatory language and only 52 pages of justification for the regulation that it has proposed. a couple of internet notes for those of you watching on line on c-span or here in the room the hash tag that we recommend is #tsasearch and i will be looking for comments and ques
they say "we," they mean them. [laughter] somebody, i was listening to something last night, matt edwards has written a book about edward r. murrow, his idol, and i was amazed to learn that he didn't go to stanford the way he cede -- said, he didn't have a degree the way he said. he was a nice working class boy from seattle or what have you and felt that he didn't have the credits, so he invented them. and then when he no longer had to, i mean, after the war report, he changed it and came clean. but in the beginning he felt in order to be in that crowd he had to, you know, give himself some false props, as hay say. -- as they say. but, and he was, you know, a stellar reporter who subsequently, i think, left rather disappointed the way journalism was changing. but anyway, if you have a tough of, tough heart and a very sharp mind, just go in it and see what happens. but it's a dangerous field now. for independent thinking, i mean. do you think the supreme court should have been more specific in the implementation of its order rather than all deliberate speed? i suppose, but it wasn't going
time since last week's bombings at the boston marathon. cbs reporter edward lawrence says marathon victims held a private memorial at the bombing site. >>> reporter: the barricades came down early this morning on boylston street the site of last week's deadly marathon bombings. prior to opening the area, police escorted bombing victims to the scene for a private ceremony tuesday night. >> when you're face to face with the people directly affected and you see the bandages, you just feel what they feel. >> reporter: these new photos appear to show the suspect 26- year-old tamerlan tsarnaev and his 19-year-old brother johar in a shootout with people friday. tamerlan was killed. johar was captured later hiding in a bow. dzhokhar tsarnaev was taken here to beth israel medical center with gunshot wounds. he was upgraded to fair condition tuesday allowing interrogators to ask him more questions about the events leading up to the bombings. cbs news has learned tsarnaev told investigators he and his brother were motivated through online jihadist websites. officials believe they may have rea
but related issues of the government and travel. first, we will hear from edward hasbrouck. when i saw him give this presentation at the brennan center for justice a few months ago, i thought, more people need to see and understand the intimate travel surveillance that the government conducts over all of us, law abiding citizens when we try to run the country where the world. we will have a full presentation from edward hasbrouck regarding his research, which i think is very interesting and very concerning. and then ginger mccall will talk to us about the introduction of a rulemaking with the tsa and the strip search being required by court order. the tsa took 20 months to produce two sentences of regulatory language and only some of the language was used that was proposed. we welcome you who are lucky here in the room were on c-span. the hash tag is #tsasearch. with regard to the rulemaking, there is a url that could take you to their webpage, where they accept comments on the strip search rulemaking policy. it is tsa/comments. tiny url.com/tsa comments. so first, edward hasbrouck. at our
issues with the government and the travel. first, we will hear from edward hasbrouck. when i saw him give this presentation at nyu a few months ago, i thought more people need to see this and understand the intimate travel surveillance that the government conducts over all of us law abiding and lawbreaking alike when we try to move around the country and the world. first, full presentation from edward hasbrouck regarding his research in this area, which i think is very interesting and concerning. after that, we will turn to the .ewsy topic, the tsa rulemaking ginger mccall will talk to us about the latest developments in that area of the introduction of a rule making on the part of the tsa, having to do with the strip search policy, being required by court order and the tsa having taken 20 months to produce two sentences of purgatory language and only 52 pages of the vast justification. a couple of internet notes for those of you watch online on c- span or here in the room, the .ashtag is #tsasearch i will be looking for comments and questions that i will use throughout the events. feel f
. >> well, something makes no sense. i want to bring in our guests now. milwaukee chief of police, edward flynn, joins us. and msnbc political analyst, professor michael eric dyson is here with me in new york. chief flynn, thank you, sir, for joining us. as a law enforcement professional charged with maintaining the peace of the nation, is it your view that more guns will lead to improved law and order in this country? >> well, i read the nra's report, and it looks to me to be a cynical but clever diversion from the important discussion you alluded to in the introduction. you know, if we follow the logic of their report, it's a little bit like if the cdc was run by the nra, they would oppose flu vaccines in favor of building as many hospitals as possible. this is what this nra report does. it doesn't talk about costs, and it cynically expects local government to go to the department of homeland security for funding that quite simply does not the exist. >> but sir -- >> it's really, as i say, cynical diversion from the real issues. >> but sir, you lead the good guys with guns. is that all
congressman mickey edwards on politics in america. the annapolis book festival live today, part of booktv this weekend on c-span2. >> alex watson and his father, lynn university professor robert watson, talk about their campaign to get families to read and write together. the two have recently authored a book for children called "tsunami." it's about 50 minutes. [applause] >> thank you, and welcome, everyone. >> afternoon, everybody, thank you for coming. i'm alex, and this is my father, robert. [laughter] all right. so the year was 1946. world war ii had just ended, and the people of hawaii finally felt safe. unknown to them, 2,000 miles away near alaska there was a different kind of threat. in the middle of the night, there was a major undersea earthquake which triggered a 1 100-foot wave completely destroying a lighthouse, and the lighthouse keeper was swept out to sea. the massive wave headed straight for hawaii. without warning, the first waves hit at dawn, they were only 2 feet high. it was april 1st, so some thought it was an april fool's day joke, but it wasn't. it was picked by
. >> reporter: oh, my goodness. today the luster is off not only silver but edward's main investment, gold. we are visiting you on a day when gold has dropped more than $60. >> so far, yes. >> reporter: so far. not a good day for you. >> oh, no, it's all good. >> reporter: why is it all good? >> because all my products are on sale. >> reporter: in the world of gold investing, always a silver lining. edwards expects gold prices to recover and rise like never before. he like many gold investors expects inflation to increase dramatically in the future because of monetary policy today. >> the monetary easing that the fed is doing, that the japanese are doing is unprecedented. and we're heading into waters that are uncharted. >> reporter: and uncertainty drives gold prices. >> yeah, sure. up, yes. >> reporter: during the rush back in 2011 gold traded at nearly $2,000 an ounce. today, america's gold reserves have lost tens of billions of dollars in value as investors find there's more money to be made in housing and the stock market. can edwards in the business since 1977 has seen it all before. >>
are either dead or arrested and i still believe that. >> boston police commissioner edward davis. make sure you stay right there because in a few minutes, more of my conversation with the commissioner. he'll take us step by step through that fateful night. the senseless killing of a police officer, the chase, the manhunt, and finally the arrest of dzhokhar tsarnaev. lots to talk about today about the way fbi firsthand ld the case of tamerlan tsarnaev and as we have reported, fbi agents interviewed tsarnaev back in 2011 at the request of the russian government. the russians believed he was a follower of radical islam. he was also interviewed but no action was taken and there was also no fbi follow-up after he took an extended trip to russia last year. today on cnn's "state of the union" senator lindsey graham said there were plenty of clues that tsarnaev had been radicalized. >> the ball was dropped in one of two ways. the fbi missed a lot of things, is one potential answer. or our laws do not allow the fbi to follow-up in a sound, solid way. there was a lot to be learned from this guy. he w
of the word, her husband, -- edward, her husband, tad. > and the loss of her mother that center to springfield and the first place. -- sent her to springfield in the first place. her life is shattered by loss. served as how she the first lady to the president. her intuition about individuals is more accurate than that of her husband. guzzling can listen to her? -- does lincoln listen to her? >> think that she tried to advise him but his advisers did not want her interfering. that was definitely the case when he was dying and they to occur from the room and would whicht her in to mourn, was a traditional thing in her culture. the wife stays with the husband until he dies. they robbed her of that. robinson asks, di mary out of create enemies social rivals? who was our main antagonist? of rivals.a number the daughter of the secretary of the treasury made no secret about wanting to replace lincoln in the white house. kate was quite the belle of the ball. it is safe to say that mrs. lincoln had no great love lost for kate. and it ise legend, accurate, the stories of her accompanying the president t
? and is this a business model that's actually going to pay off? joining us with their thoughts, edward williams of bmo capital markets and nicholas carlson of business insider. good to see you both. welcome to the program. edward, what do you think? you've got that and you have "house of cards," which has been a big winner for netflix, but an expensive winner at the same time, right? >> it has. but i think the reality is that people are really going to change the way that they're watching video content. and if you look at the over-the-top distribution of video content that netflix is doing and amazon is doing and hulu is doing, it's a far better experience. i think you're going to see that in order to sustain the systems, you also need to see them put more original programming out there. so what amazon is doing and what netflix has done with "house of cards," i think we'll see much more of and much more capital being committed to it and i think we'll see a fair amount of success coming from it. >> can amazon do it? you point out that amazon is not known for streaming businesses. do you think they'll b
on friday night. cbs reporter edward lawrence joins us live in boston now with the very latest. good morning. >> porter: good morning, frank and michelle. the mother of the two accused suspect respects in the bombing actually spoke -- suspects in the bombing actually spoke to a british newspaper and said she is proud of her two boys. she said there is no way she believes they are guilty of this crime but the 19-year-old suspect told interrogators inside his hospital room that he did play a role in the bombings here in boston according to cbs news sources. 19-year-old johar tsarnaev's hospital room became a makeshift courtroom monday. a federal judge arraigned the terror suspect and announced he is being charged with using a weapon of mass destruction during boston marathon bombings last week. it killed three and injured 180. if convicted, he could face the death penalty. prosecutors believe he and his 26-year-old brother tamerlan placed two pressure cooker bombs on boylston street around the marathon finish line. tamerlan died friday in a shootout witpolice r being treated for gunshoun he a
. what's next for the precious metal? bringing in edward mere, senior correspondent at iatlfc stone. thank you for being here. >> thank you. a lot of people are saying you have goldman sachs saying gold is time to get out. some analysts say we'll see gold at $1200 an ounce. you disagree with them, why? >> well, i'm not sure i disagree with them. in our last report, we have been very cautious op gold, especially given that it's broken key support levels. it's trading between 15-25 to 1800 in the last 18 months, and everybody's been waiting for if -- for it to pick up steam and move ahead. it's not. able to do it. the bottom fell from the market in the mast few days issue and i think we'll head lower from here. >> yeah, i think there's a lot of people who agree with you. is one of the reasons we are lower hedge funds bought gold, need out, and they have not liquidated? >> that's partly one of the factors. of course, we won't know for a few more weeks until the initial filings come out. there's a lot of money tied up in the physical atfs, and, of course, as people get out, especially t
but the anticipation of the problems in cyprus expanded in last few months. ashley: edward, look, 88 million. that's a lot for anyone. but what is the typical price? what price range are you looking at for these russian buyers? >> today's sweet spot has increased and primarily because of these large deals happening over the last several years but typically we're seeing deals between five and 10 million dollars. that is considered normal for these foreign buyers. liz: do they always pay cash? >> it has been very much cash deals and again, that is, because it is normal from where they're coming from. equity is used to buy 100% rather than looking at mortgaging properties. that is not typical where they're coming from. liz: what do they tell you they want? do they want a real platinum building, one with great prove announce, one with a great name to it? >> they're looking primarily for the best locations and best buildings in those location. some of the new construction we're seeing right now is very much what they're desiring. ashley: what do they do with them, edward? are they living in them? buyin
could be out of bankruptcy by june. edward lawrence for cbs news. >>> and creditors, they issued a statement saying that the group disagrees with their rulings. they did not say whether or not they would appeal the judge's decision. >>> south korea is telling the north korean dictator if you think you can attack and get away with it, think again. the cbs reporter tells us that south korea, they will be talking tough because we've got their backs. >> he is not the first north korean dictator to threaten war with south korea and their allies. this time it's different. south korea's new president is dealing with a new political reality. >> the south korean people have said we're not going to stand for this anymore. >> reporter: retired general walter sharp, former commander of u.s. forces in korea says another incident like this 201shelling were triggered not just for a retaliation, but a combined attack by u.s. and south korean forces. >> things have changed since november of 2010. if he does another attack like that, the responses will be swift and it's going to be strong. >> repo
about the terms that we use for psychiatric illness. now, if you tell me, edward, you have this diagnosis and if you don't believe you have that diagnose, it's reinforcing my belief that you have this diagnosis. that's problematic. but and you can see that really the issue, i think there is a reason this is interesting because it treks back to the real issue of mental health which is what was the responsibility of society to provide services and supports for psychiatric illness. we want to ask that question, with should ask what was the rate at which we fund services and supports for mental illness, what was the range of services we provide. the question about whether or not somebody agrees to your diagnosis and as a matter of course, your average person in the system for several times will receive 3, 4, 5 times different diagnosis. without getting technical, there are issues that are broader an that's what this panel is interested about. we have to ask ourselves do we believe as a society our role is to take people's choice and freedom away from them under certain circumst
edwards vlasic gets a 10 minute misconduct it matters not sharks win 4-2 . asomugha introduced the 49ers introduced their new corner back nnamdi asomugha today in santa clara asomugha signed a non guaranteed contract worth $1.6 million which could reach $3 million with bonuses.again, none of it is guaranteed asomugha was a standout with cal and then the raiders before signing a 5-year, $60 million deal in philadelphia - who cut him two months ago >> the sharks win 4-2. they are on fire for the sixth straight victory earlier i said that there are going to blow up candlestick stadium it is excellent going to be in a couple of days. so they are going to play the last game in the stadium is wired with dynamite! [laughter] >> pam: you blew it. >> gary: and he made me laugh. people sitting in the stand. and the supplier has signed a one-year deal. to play defensive back. after a great career with cal. now, he says that it is not about grea[ teen ] times are good, aren't they, kids? it's nice having u-verse, isn't it? see back in my day, we didn't have these newfangled wireless receivers. fangl
grandmother, merced, nina played the piano and read poems, while edward read the poems besides playing the fiddle and violin, behaved like an avant garde composer, moving around furniture. according to the journalist were a dynamic duo that rescued the famous hotel sevilla from dereliction in 1919. they also constructed the biltmore neighborhood where many irish american families have homes. when i said irish americans, i go back to the americas, irish-spanish americans and french-irish, et cetera, and my own family live there. other famous irish american personalities at the time were, for example, in the news world the e. f. obrian, the editor of the times of cuba and in the cuban roman catholic church, father moynihan, no relationship to my grandmother, loved for his kindness and great sense of humor. born in the 20's in havana were of irish descent. they were fran emilio. he was entirely blind by the age of 13 but learned gerschwin's rhapsody in blue by using braille scores. he was also one of the major instrumentalists of the feeling -- many of you recollected remember -- the thr
fer vernt praise for the port staff for j edwards, for phil williamson, by ron, jennifer, monique, your whole team has been so responsive, so right there, everything that we've needed including from ken cough man and the fire men's as well as, you are stickler and i do respect that for good reason, but even as sticklers you have been there every time we've asked and fabulous to working out the solutions to open on april 17th which is so very important to us. i have to say that really commend every person who has worked with us and just amazing. everything we call you are there. so what we have learned not too long ago we found out from a trade week, the exploratoria tourm is the 5th brand than any other place, behind the louver, no. 5. if we were no. 5, just wait till you see what we are doing with pier no. 7 and 8. thank you very much. [ applause ] >> thank you so much and especially to your development committee. thank you for choosing to do this on the water front and congratulations on the award. thank you for coming today. commissioners i have one last item. which i would lik
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